40 years of IVF – key breakthroughs

2018 marks the 40th year since the birth of the first IVF baby. This remarkable technological advance changed the world and millions of children are alive today that could not have been born before the development of IVF.

Here we will discuss some of the key breakthroughs in the history of IVF and what advances we may be able to look forward to in the future.

 

1.       The evolution of gonadotropins

The evolution of gonadotropins has been instrumental in improving IVF live birth outcomes.  Early attempts to extract preparations from animals, human cadavers and human urine encountered issues with purity and risk of disease. However, over the decades dedicated research striving for purer, safer and more efficacious gonadotropins have led us to where we are today. Now, availability of recombinant hFSH, recombinant hLH and recombinant hCG allow clinicians to develop individualised protocols for each patient. Coupled with personalised and precise dosing, we can now see both improved patient safety and increased live birth rates. And with more research currently taking place into developing oral active FSH antagonists and agonists we hope to see this evolution continue.

 

2.       Advanced embryo culture systems

Culture media has come a long way since the simple salt solutions developed nearly 150 years ago. IVF laboratories are now using complex optimised media, standardised and regulated to promote consistency and a high level of quality. And as we know, a high quality media is just one factor to consider when culturing embryos. The development of closed culture systems has provided embryologists with a stable environment helping to shield the embryo from outside stresses and increase both efficiency and efficacy.

 

3.       Cryopreservation

In 1971 the field of embryology changed as the first cleavage-stage mouse embryos were frozen. This led the way for cryopreservation of human embryos at all embryonic stages. Improvements in cryopreservation technologies mean that embryo survival rates are now nearly 100% and provided women with the choice to freeze eggs for fertility preservation as well as for medical reasons. Research continues into this area, and the debate on whether a ‘freeze all’ approach should be applied is still being hotly debated.

 

4.       ICSI

Early pioneers in IVF encountered a frustrating issue. Often couples could not partake in IVF programmes due to a low number of mobile sperm and there were no techniques to effectively address this problem. A breakthrough came with the development of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) which allows individual sperm cells to be carefully selected and injected into the embryo. ICSI can almost be considered as much of a breakthrough as IVF itself, greatly extending the success of infertility treatments. ICSI technology is here to stay and is expected to play a pivotal role in the future treatments of male infertility including stem cell therapy and extended germ culture.

 

5.       Time-lapse technology

Equipment in the IVF laboratory has dramatically evolved over the decades. Advances in engineering have provided ever more effective options for creating stable and controlled culture environments for embryos. A recent breakthrough has been the availability of time-lapse technology which allows embryologists to follow development of the embryo frame by frame, allowing for an even better understanding of developmental timing and morphology.

 

These are just a few of the many key developments in the history of IVF. And the future is even brighter with key research and advancements still being made in the field of reproductive medicine. At this year’s COGI conference on November 26-28, experts will be discussing some of the key controversies and sharing their latest research. We will be attending to provide you with the highlights so stay tuned for the most up to date insights in this remarkable area.

 

Sources:

Niderberger C, Pellicer A, Cohen J, et al. Forty years of IVF. Fertil and Steril. 2018; 110(2):185-324.e5